500 Days of Rosé (by the Bay)

There’s no connection really between the rom-com and wine. Just word nerd, wine newbie (hopeless romantic) me playing. I suppose we could make up some far-fetched, metaphorical association like, look beyond the superficial…but still, there’s no connection.

Just when I thought I knew something about rosé, I realized I wasn’t even close after attending Winebow’s #RosebytheBay held at Smith & Wollensky, South Pointe Park. Members of the wine trade were invited to discover over 100 rosé wines from Europe, South America, North America, Australia and South Africa.

Credit: Image by Paul Brennan from Pixabay

How does a wine newbie like me choose what to taste with over 100, various shades of pink? With such sleek branding, it’s very tempting to be drawn to beautiful labels and bottle design. However, that’s like choosing a car for its color. So, I tried to select between old world and new world; a region or grape variety that I may have read about, but had not tried; and what was easiest to reach because at times, there wasn’t much elbow room. In fact, I totally missed seeing the wines from Australia and South Africa.

Some Wine Highlights

The fun part was that evening when I took a chance to learn more about what I drank and search for a good story. (If I only I had each wine in front of me while reading and taking notes!)

France

As I had mentioned before, Côtes de Provence is France’s oldest wine region and rosé, although different from what we know it as today, was the first type of wine produced there by Greeks who had brought the vines to the area. At the Winebow event, there were rosé wines from at least eight other regions of France.

2017 Domaine de Fontsainte Corbières Gris de Gris: I chose this wine because I was attracted to its golden color and knew nothing about “Gris de Gris.” Corbières is an important appellation of the Languedoc-Roussillon region of southern France. It is made up of five grape varieties: 50% Grenache Gris; 40% Grenache Noir and Carignan; 10% Cinsault and Mourvèdre. Yves Laboucarié established Fontsainte in its current incarnation in 1971 and is one among the first to use “carbonic maceration” which simply put, is when whole grapes are gently placed in an enclosed fermentation vessel and blanketed with carbon dioxide (Ch 5 of the CSW.)  If you’re curious about Grenache Gris or Noir, see this article. Read more about Domaine de Fontsainte here.

2017 Henri Bourgeois Sancerre Rosé Jeunes Vigne: While still only ankle deep into the CSW textbook, I’ve learned that Sancerre is not a grape (and I can now avoid a future soirée faux pas), but an appellation (see the link above) located in the Loire Valley. The grape BTW is Pinot Noir — indigenous to France, but grown elsewhere too. You can read all about the wine at this link.

2018 Raffault Chinon Rosé: When the Wine Therapist (see note at the end) tells you, “drink this one,” you do. Chinon like Sancerre is an appellation and Domaine Olga Raffault is stated as being, “one of the long-time reference points for top-quality, traditional Chinon wines.” Left widowed when her children were very young, Olga would operate the wine estate with a German WWII prisoner who would eventually become the winemaker. If you enjoy a good story like me, click here. 100% Cabernet Franc. If you’re new to wine like me, you may also wish to review, Saignée (“bled”) rosé and the two other methods: maceration and blending.

Spain

2018 Viña Real Rosado: I am not very familiar with Spanish wines, so I chose to try one from Rioja and another from Ribera del Duero. The Viña Real is made from Viura: 75%, Tempranillo: 15%, and 10% Garnacha (Grenache in French.) Viura is the most important grape from Rioja. In Catalonia it is called Macabeo and in Southern France, Macabeu. Read more about this grape here and the winery here.

2018 Cepa 21 Hito Rosado: Made from 100% Tempranillo, Cepa 21 (Ribera del Duero) aims to get the most out of the grape’s characteristics and of the unique environment where they are created. They use traditional methods, but customize them to modern trends. You can find out more about this young winery led by brothers José and Javier Moro at this link.

(Side Note: Future Spanish Wine and Blog posts to come, as I’ve just booked myself a trip to Spain!)

USA

2018 Wölffer Estate Rosé: Long Island (Sagaponack) is the appellation and it is made up of: 52% Merlot, 20% Chardonnay, 13% Cabernet Franc, 11% Cabernet Sauvignon, 2% Sauvignon Blanc, 1% Riesling and 1% Pinot Noir. Read more about the estate here. This was the first time I’ve tried a wine from New York and I really liked it!

Italy

2018 Argiolas Serra Lori Rosato: Founded in 1938 by Antonio Argiolas, Argiolas is the foremost wine estate on the island of Sardinia producing archetypal wines from native varietals. Serra Lori is a dry rosato blended from Cannonau, Monica, Carignano, and Bovale Sardo. Read more here.

2019 Pico Maccario Rosé Lavignone Rosato Piemonte: The rose (flower) on the bottle symbolizes the estate where there are 4,500 rosebushes all from the same clone and there’s one planted at the end of each vine row. Read the full story and details about this 100% Barbera wine here.

2011 Contratto For England Brut Rosé: Who can resist pink bubbles and surely, this wine must have been one of the best ones there! I think this says it all: old vine, 100% Pinot Noir, Metodo Classico aka Traditional Method, Méthode Champenoise, etc. Read more here. Someone spoil me: I’ll take ten!

2018 GD Vajra Rosabella: “Tasting the wine is like seeing a star. If you only see a star, you’ve lost the beauty of the universe,” says Aldo Vaira who made his first vintage when only 19 years old. From there, I encourage you to explore the rest. Here is the video and website at this link. Nebbiolo 85%, Barbera 5%, Dolcetto 10%

Winebow had someone making cocktails too, showcasing some of their liqueurs and spirits. Delicious!

On that delightful note, it’s best to wine-down this post.

Now two months into the CSW textbook, I’m finding that learning about wine gives me the same sensation as understanding a work of art. It begins with a visceral response, but then the true beauty reveals itself when an investigation begins. The pursuit of knowledge is infinite, or in the great words of Albert Einstein:

Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I’m not sure about the universe.

Until next time, raise your glass and listen to what it tells you and know that at least when it comes to rosé, Summer is with you for as long as you want! (Oops, strike out paragraph 1!!)

@AllegoryPR #MyArtEscape

My wine journey would never have begun or continue without The Wine Therapist’s (aka Stefano at Wine by the Bay) guidance. No wine passes from his hand to mine (or any of his loyal clients and friends) without an anecdote and a smile. Follow him at @WinebytheBay

Rosé from Argentina

Postscript: There’s no such thing as Rosé Season apart from marketing! Grapes (like any other fruit or vegetable) follow a growth and harvest season as it relates to its region’s climate timeline. What differentiates wines are all of the other winemaking variables like fermentation. As you can see by the release years, most probably spent more time getting from their place of origin to your table, than in a bottle!  What makes Summer a Rosé season is comparable to why you’d choose an iced latté over a hot one. It’s poolside chill that pairs well with typical summer weather dishes.

Grape Expectations: Metaphors and Correlations

It’s 81°f (27.22°c) in South Florida. With heat on the rise, my palate is definitely springing forward – grilling and chilling with a glass of rosé in my hand and swapping out carbs for arugula (my favorite leafy green), avocado and roasted or sautéed vegetables.

However, today it’s Sunday and after two consecutive, long runs, I’m ready to fall in the pot. It’s hot out though and having the oven on for three or four hours will kill the a/c bill. TG for YouTube that gives me a quick lesson on how to braise on a grill. My Weber has good temperature control and cast iron pot is the perfect size.

I’m now ankle deep into the CSW textbook (chapter 6 to be exact), testing myself each day using Quizlet lessons and flashcards and feeling a little more confident about the content. It’s not easy though and although I read and write every day for work, self-study at this level has been a struggle.

The Dish: Braised Beef Ragu with Pappardelle Pasta

Pappardelle is a word nerd/foodie plaything. Derived from the Tuscan dialect word ‘pappare’ which means to gobble up food, it’s like Italian onomatopoeia.  Just slurp up those tasty, wide egg noodles straight from the pot, p,p,p, pappare! Read more here.

There are many recipes for beef ragu to be found and most are similar. I chose this one. There’s something very relaxing about a slow cooked, Sunday meal.  During the week, the long prep time alone is unmanageable. However, I love taking the time to wash and chop knowing that the holy trinity of cooking, (also called mirepoix in French and soffritto in Italian) onions, carrots and celery 2:1:1, is the foundation of all things yummy. The greatest thing is that once everything is in the pot, you have at least three hours to read a book, watch a movie or take a nap!

The Wine: Gaja Sito Moresco Rosso Langhe 2014

Nebbiolo of Barbaresco — Creative Commons

Google Gaja (the family and winery name) and you’ll quickly find out that the wine I chose is on the cheaper side of the Gaja skew. And, if you’re a wine collecting aficionado, you may be turning your fine-tuned nose up at my choice. However, wine newbie me says this wine is great value wow! It’s a blend as opposed to a varietal (single named grape variety) and composed of Nebbiolo (the prized grape of the region, Piemonte), Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. Other years or vintages when referring to wine, seem to have a small percentage of one of the region’s other indigenous grapes, Barbera.

So, let’s discuss what’s up with the Nebbiolo fascination and what goes into the name?

There’s a plethora of information about the Nebbiolo grape and the most sought after wines of the Piemonte (aka Piedmont: the region), Barolo (an appellation) aka the king of wines and Barbaresco (another appellation). There’s scholarly articles, heated debates and even a movie: Barolo Boys.

Langhe

In my pursuit of wine knowledge, here’s what I found most interesting about this thin-skinned grape. Unlike Cabernet Sauvignon (red) or Chardonnay (white) that can be planted almost anywhere in the world and acquire new characteristics depending on where it has been planted, the Nebbiolo grape does best in not just its country of origin, but its specific area which is Northwest Italy. This gem loves its own soil and doesn’t develop anywhere near to as good, elsewhere.

I could go on and on, but it’s best that I leave Nebbiolo history and the wine facts to the experts. An enjoyable start can be seen in this video. Dig deeper and you’ll be amused by all of the old school and new school banter.

Creative Commons

As for the name, I’m learning that the winery is much more than a brand. Gaja has a long history and world-renowned reputation. Angelo Gaja was a bold, risk taker who broke away from the old traditions and tried seemingly blasphemous new approaches to winemaking. Angelo along with his wife and grown children manage everything together. I enjoyed reading this Wine Spectator article where he and his daughter Gaia discuss climate change and its impact on wine production.

I’m more of a #YOLO, drink-now and budget conscious wine newbie. However, if you have the means and patience to wait, certainly start your collection with one of their wines. Read more about the Sito Moresco here.

The Metaphor

Oh Canada!

My parents were immigrants. My mother at eighteen was ready to jump solo on a ship from England to Canada as part of a migration incentive program. Her Mom wasn’t so anxious and followed her, dragging two unwilling siblings on the long, Atlantic crossing. Mom never looked back. My Dad on the other hand, left his birthplace to find work opportunities in Canada. He spent his whole life wanting to return. On one of his annual visits back to his country, he died suddenly. Doing what he loved most, gardening, I have to believe that he passed happily.

I like many of you are transplants. We get cut from the vine of our birthplace and are grafted somewhere else. We thrive and survive as a different version of ourselves. Whereas we think we might not belong anywhere else, it is almost always possible.

The trilogy of grapes or vegetables in today’s dish demonstrates the beauty of blends. Each component brings color and character to the medley. We, like those components, do not lose our distinct flavor, but contribute to something richer.

Photo Credit

“In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt.” ― Margaret Atwood, Bluebeard’s Egg

Until next time, swirl and breathe deeply into your glass. As the aroma rises, think fondly about the dirt to which the grape came from and where it will go.

#MyArtEscape @AllegoryPR

NOTE: This Blog post was inspired by Chapters 3 and 4 of the Certified Specialist of Wine Guide. Both wines mentioned are from the Langhe wine region in Piemonte. The wine I cooked the beef with was (Dolcetto) Domenico Clerico Langhe Dolcetto Visadi 2013. A very reasonable price for a good wine that I will definitely drink rather than cook with next time!

Giddy in Pink: Provence & Primavera

Hashtag ‘Rosé All Day’ #RoseAllDay! Yes, I’m one of those gals who can’t wait to see the shelves stocked up with slim, frosty bottles with triangular punts (that’s the technical name for the pushed up center of the bottle’s base.) There’s some serious glam marketing going into the production of this hot seller (pardon the pun) and its sexy, bottle design.

Mockingbird in my backyard calling for a mate.

This easy to drink, chilled glass of pink also means Spring is in the air. Birds and bees do it, but did you know that vines do it too? Grapes are hermaphrodites, meaning they contain both male and female organs and can self-fertilize. However, dust in the wind, there was some serious vine fornication taking place long before it became the fermented juice in your glass. For example, Cabernet Sauvignon (indigenous to Bordeaux) is a cross between Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc. ‘Cross’ is the offspring of sexual reproduction between different subspecies within the same species. Give that some thought the next time you witness or suffer from pollen blowing around.

Wikipedia Commons

If you wish to read a more scientific and serious explanation of the anatomy of the grapevine, click here.

The Wine: Chateau Maupague, Sainte-Victoire Côtes de Provence Rosé 2016

I’m “delayed” in the South of France (darn), but I’ve left the lavender fields and Châteauneuf-du-Pape behind for Côtes de Provence and more specifically Sainte Victoire, a favorite landscape of Cezanne and Picasso. The area is more sheltered from the Mistral winds than other wine producing areas of Provence and high limestone soil makes for fewer yields but high quality fruit. 80% of Sainte Victoire wine is rosé.

For wine newbies like me, you may wish to know that rosé is pink because the skins of the red grapes touch the wine for a few hours whereas in making red wine, the skins are left as part of the fermentation process for a few weeks. There are three primary methods of making rosé wine: Maceration, Saignée and Blending. Read more here.

Côtes de Provence is home to France’s oldest vineyards and oldest wine producing region. When the Greeks arrived in what is now called Marseille, they planted the first vines and the wine at that time, was a rosé. Not the pale and delicate wine that we are familiar with today, but more rustic, says Annabelle Sumeire of Famille Sumeire | Vignerons en Provence in this video. Annabelle Sumeire’s family own Chateau Maupague and other vineyards in Provence.

Wine Facts: Chateau Maupague, Sainte-Victoire Côtes de Provence Rosé 2016

  • Grenache 80%, Cinsault 10% Syrah 10%
  • Silver medal at the Concours Bettane et Desseauve Prix Plaisir 2017
  • 88 at the Wine Enthusiast 2017
  • Gold medal – 89 Gilbert et Gaillard 2017
  • Bronze medal at the IWSC 2017

Learn more about the different grapes at this link. You can find some Provence tour information here and learn more about the vineyard here.

The Pairing

Bonci, Rome

On a trip to Rome, I was introduced to a variety of pizza toppings (check out Bonci pizza if you do go to Rome – future #TBT blog post in the queue.) I know we’re now exposed to higher quality pizza rather than the soggy versions that arrive in a box, but American pizza doesn’t compare to the quality in Italy.

If you’ve been following my Blog, you know that I try to stick as close as possible to the origins of a particular dish. I did make the traditional prosciutto and arugula version and you can find a recipe here. However, today’s pizza is a fusion of French and Italian ingredients. I did not follow this exact recipe, but used the key ingredients that I thought would pair well with the wine: crab, artichokes, goat cheese and basil.

“Breads of La Brea Bakery” by Nancy Silverton

My fascination for dough and bread making was inspired by Nancy Silverton and I’ve been gradually reading her book, “Breads from the La Brea Bakery.” Since I’m not yet ready to make homemade yeast like Nancy does, my favorite thin crust pizza dough recipe is this one. Before adding the toppings I brushed the dough lightly with olive oil and crushed tomatoes infused with a garlic clove. I prefer to use a gas grill and pizza stone rather than my oven. With a 500 degree, consistent heat, you almost achieve the wood fired pizza taste.

An Artichoke Anecdote

Appropriately for Spring, I’ll end today’s post with a carnal spin on a vegetable story:

The wife of King Henry II of France, Catherine de Medici introduced a wide variety of Italian foods to French cooking including ice cream, sweetbreads, truffles, artichokes, broccoli, and spinach. Catherine, who was known throughout France as La Florentine loved spinach so much that any French dish which incorporated spinach was called ‘a la Florentine.’                     

“Education of Cupid” by Antonio da Correggio from Catherine de Medici’s Room
Château de Chenonceau, Catherine de’ Medici’s room | Wikipedia Commons

Catherine scandalized French society with her addiction to artichokes which had the reputation of being an aphrodisiac. She also encouraged her entourage to eat artichokes, particularly the L’ escadron volant (the flying squadron), a bevy of beautiful girls who were coached as “spies of the couch,” bedding down with the influential nobles. The L’escadron volant traveled everywhere with Catherine, a sort of whorehouse on wheels. By the end Catherine’s reign, artichokes had become one of the most popular French vegetable.

 [Source: Medadvocates]

So today, let’s raise a glass to Catherine! If it wasn’t for her, we’d still be in Victorian era fashion, boiling green beans!

“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.” – Virginia Woolf

Until next time, throw caution to the wind and embrace your cravings!

@AllegoryPR #MyArtEscape

Note: Today’s Blog post was inspired by Chapter 3, “Grape Varieties” of the Certified Specialist of Wine Guide.

Lavender, Leather and Lactic Acid

It’s been awhile since I blogged or spent time in my kitchen, apart from preparing something quick for the sake of sustenance and getting me through one work day and into the next.

I’ve missed cooking slow, reading for pleasure and writing without a deadline looming overhead.

Serrano Market at Yellow Green Farmers Market (Hollywood, FL)

Time for a brief, mental getaway where I’ll pack the car with a cooler, head over to Yellow Green Farmers Market early and then drive over to Hollywood North Beach for a run. In 45 minutes, I’m able to run a little over four miles, north to the Dania Beach pier and back down to the Hollywood Broadwalk. (Go ahead and call me slow poke, but I’m not running for time, and have found a great way to beat the deadline stress plus maintain the same dress size despite my “calories don’t matter” cooking adventures!)

Pierre et Vacances located in Cannes La Bocca. The apartment is small, but the view is big!

This weekend, my palate travels to Provence. Probably one of my most memorable holidays was spending two weeks in the French Riviera. Set southwest of Nice, Pierre et Vacances is a chain of short term rental apartments in Europe. In Cannes La Bocca, you can book a fair size apartment with a small kitchen and a large balcony that overlooks both the resort pool and crystal blue Mediterranean! Considering how close it is to fancy Cannes, it’s not that expensive. Check it out here. It’s also steps from the market where you can pick up a baguette, fresh vegetables, cheese and a rotisserie chicken.

There’s so much more to Provence than the Mediterranean and should I return, I’ll hop on a train and head northwest. There you’ll find me prancing through fields of lavender and sipping on Châteauneuf-du-Pape!

However, in the meantime I’ve found a way to bring a little Provence into my kitchen. – be forewarned that roast chicken will never be the same after you try this recipe.

Lavender from Herban Tapestry located at Yellow Green Farmers Market

A Little History of Lavender

It was impossible to find fresh lavender, but Herban Tapestry (located in Yellow Green Farmers Market) offered three options. The aroma of the less expensive one didn’t seem significant enough to add to the dish and the most expensive one seemed better for a soak in the tub. So, I chose the mid-priced offering which smelled fragrant enough to blend nicely with thyme and rosemary.

Creative Commons

The best time to find lavender in full bloom in Provence is early to mid-July, although travel forums recommend that you check closer to your trip since the season lasts only a few weeks. Jean Giono wrote: “Lavender is the soul of Provence.” It was the Romans, however, that were the first to discover how to extract the oil. Did you know that lavender derives from Latin lavare meaning to ‘wash?’

The Pairing Wine: 2015 Clos Saint Michel Châteauneuf-du-Pape Cuvée Reservée

As you know, I am a wine newbie, so if you’re a wine expert and stumbled upon this blog post, pardon my simplicity. Clos Saint Michel is the name of the winery; Châteauneuf-du-Pape is the region (and translates to the Pope’s New Castle); and the term cuvée reserve refers to a higher quality wine and in this case, from vines more than fifty years old. This wine is made up of 40% Grenache, 30% Syrah and 30% Mourvedre. The winery is situated upon the former bed of the Rhône Valley, thus the terroir (or land) is pebbly and rocky.

DYK that 95% of all wines in the Rhône come from the Southern Rhône? More than 380 million bottles per year! If you care to learn more, click here.

Aroma and Flavor Notes: I’m still grappling with tasting notes and I know that’s because of my newbi~ness. Hopefully, it all will dissipate in a year when I’m self-predicted to be at the end of the CSW textbook. When reading about this wine, I noticed the word “leather” mentioned a couple of times. Now I didn’t smell or taste leather, nor do I know if I could, as I sit comfortably on my leather sofa staring at the back like a child tempted to lick a metal pole in winter (that’s a Canadianism, I know.)

So according to Vinfolio.com, “when a critic tastes leather in a wine, he is almost always talking about the tannins. This makes sense, since the same tannins in wine are also used to tan leather. In reality, leather smells like bold red wine, not the other way around.”

Lactic Acid

Speaking of the CSW, I’m through the second round of reading chapters 1 and 2 with twenty-one more to go!  Whereas I thought from the start that I’d be diving into regions, grapes and history, I’m here stuck in acids and compounds, flashcards and brain strain.

A punny thing is that until last week, lactic acid meant to me that annoying buildup in the legs that you roll out after a run. However, in wine:

Lactic Acid is one of six different acids found in wine and created by the winemaking process. A chemical compound usually found in dairy products, this mild acid is created when a wine undergoes Malolactic Fermentation (MLF) – the process that converts Malic Acid into Lactic Acid….Lactic Acid also appears naturally in grapes during the fermentation process when the yeast converts sugar to alcohol…

Have I lost you? Well, you’ve reached the end and thanks for supporting my acidic banter. The good news is that my Provençal roast chicken is done and the Châteauneuf-du-Pape uncorked for the hour that it took me to write this post.

Follow the recipe carefully and don’t forget to add salt & pepper to the cavity of the chicken and stuff it with lemon chunks and whole cloves of garlic.
Brush olive oil onto both sides of the vegetables and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

I’ll finish by saying that the marinade and a cavity filled with lemon chunks and whole garlic cloves produced a succulent and aromatic roast chicken. It is served with a side of roast vegetables.

Until next time, let scent transport you to another place and melt away your stress, and may indulgence be the reward for a routine of moderation.

#MyArtEscape @AllegoryPR

Find Your Life “Style” at the Miami Home Design and Remodeling Show

The Miami Home Design and Remodeling Show will showcase over 150,000 square feet of home improvement products and services, plus seminars, Family Day and feature areas that enable homeowners and renters to focus on their life “style” and lifestyle. The Miami Home Show returns March 1-3 to the Mana Wynwood Convention Center. An early bird admission savings is available online until February 28th at www.homeshows.net.

Here’s what you can find and do:

Decorate or Renovate

Whether the job is big or small, the Miami Home Show offers everything needed for: kitchen and bathroom remodeling; closet design and storage; furnishing or decorating; hurricane protection; home security; lighting; flooring; doors; outdoor living including pools and hot tubs, turf, patio furniture; and much more.

“Sold” and Selfie

Josh Flagg of Bravo TV’s “Million Dollar Listing Los Angeles” speaks at the Home Improvement Stage at 2 and 4 pm on Saturday, March 2nd and 2 pm on Sunday, March 3rd. Only 35 years old, Flagg has sold over 2 billion dollars in residential real estate in just 15 years! Whether you’re a homeowner or realtor, learn tips on selling for top dollar. Flagg will be available for photos and autographs following each seminar.

Design and Influence

Get home décor advice from the Home Show’s featured Interior Designers. Each designer has made a room vignette dedicated to a Miami Influencers. Follow the red carpet and visit, Francy Arria who will design for Lauren Diaz @Fluent_In_Food; Perla Lichi for Miami Herald’s Daisy Olivera @DaisySociety; Elyse Santoro for Ines Hegedus-Garcia @Miamism; and Roberta Marcelino for Amanda Brooke @FromAppletoOrange.

Taste and Learn

Pre-register for A Taste-Full Experienceand learn food and wine pairing basics with Antonio Braschi, owner of Costa Med Bistro + Wine and Stefano Campanini, wine educator and owner of Wine by the Bay. An advance admission with seminar pass is only available online. Seating is limited and participants must be 21+.

Create and Connect

Sunday, March 3rd is Family Day and a great time to connect with the young ones and the community! Make mixed media, Truffala Trees and Mustaches inspired by Dr. Seuss’ “The Lorax” and a tribute to the beloved author’s birthday on March 2nd presented by the Miami Children’s Museum. Plus, enjoy story and craft activities presented by the Miami Dade Public Library System.

Live Tiny or a Life you Love

Living in a micro apartment or small space? Learn tiny living tips with Jasmine Nicole of Jazzin it up w/ Jasmine Nicole. Plus, discover simple ways to integrate the principles of Modern Feng Shui into your entire life with Elyse Santoro, Feng Shui Design Alchemist and Chad Welch, Lifestyle and High-Performance Coach.

Find a schedule and information at www.homeshows.net.

Josh Flagg of Million Dollar Listing Los Angeles Talks Real Estate Success at the Miami Home Show!

Miami, FL…January 30, 2019…Just what does it take to sell two billion dollars of residential real estate in only thirteen years? Josh Flagg, star of Bravo TV’s Million Dollar Listing Los Angeles will be sharing his real estate savvy at the Miami Home Design and Remodeling Show that takes place March 1-3rd at the Mana Wynwood Convention Center, 318 NW 23rd St, Miami, FL 33127.

Now thirty-five years old, Flagg began his real estate career at eighteen and has received many recognitions including being named one of the top-ranked agents in California and nationally by sales volume by the Wall Street Journal and Forbes’ 30 Under 30 (2012.)

Continue reading “Josh Flagg of Million Dollar Listing Los Angeles Talks Real Estate Success at the Miami Home Show!”

Allegory PR Year in Review

 Many thanks to our Clients & Followers! It’s been a great year and we look forward to building upon our success in 2019.

Ask about our new service package: Social Media Advertising to Optimize Website Traffic; E-Commerce; and Website Development and SEO.

lisa@allegorypr.com

A Fantesca-tic Wine Tasting with DLynn Proctor of SOMM Films

Wine by the Bay hosts an exclusive evening with DLynn Proctor, Director of Fantesca Estate & Winery (St. Helena, Napa Valley) and one of the four featured subjects in newly released SOMM III and preceding films, SOMM (2012) and SOMM: Into the Bottle (2015.) This event is a rare opportunity to taste all of Fantesca’s limited production wine portfolio, of which three wines are made by iconic winemaker, Heidi Barrett also known as the “Wine Diva of Napa” and the “First Lady of Wine.” Continue reading “A Fantesca-tic Wine Tasting with DLynn Proctor of SOMM Films”

Architect Jo Palma Sets His Sights on Proposed, Downtown Miami River Opportunity Zone

2) Conceptual rendering of the public plaza and the art gallery above, looking from SW 3rd Street. Courtesy Photo | PALMA+PARTNERS

Miami, FL…November 20, 2018…Award-winning Architect, Jo Palma sets sights on his first design project in Miami. Plans for The Basel Miami, a new Downtown Miami mixed-used, high rise development are underway and Sean McCormick, Project Developer is seeking a Joint Venture Partner and Signature Luxury Hotel Brand.

The Basel Miami (www.thebaselmiami.com) is proposed to be situated at 205 SW 3rd Street, in an Opportunity Zone directly across the street from the recently approved, Adler Group Miami Riverside Center (currently the City of Miami Administration Building.)

Inspired by and fusing modern art and architecture, the $100,000,000, 36-story 234,000 square foot tower will become a new icon within the Miami skyline.  Its uses redefine how a modern art exhibition venue, artists and their studios, hospitality and lifestyle marry into one address.  The base of the tower will introduce a Modern Art Gallery with artist studios, offices immediately above it, a boutique hotel and private residences at its upper floors.  Both the tower’s plan and slipping volumes optimize prominent views to the city surrounded with an unprecedented presence and experience in Miami.

McCormick feels that PALMA+PARTNERS will lead Miami into a new era of cutting-edge global and sustainable design that will usher in the future of Downtown Miami.

“We don’t want to boast about the next tallest building in Miami,” states McCormick. “We want to build a signature structure of iconic design that relates to the Miami of today.”

Jo Palma is the Founder and Design Partner of PALMA+PARTNERS. With built work on five continents, including some of the world’s largest sustainable mega buildings, Jo oversees design of all projects working closely with the project teams to assure the original design intent and project vision are achieved through project completion. Over the course of his career, Palma has been published in international architecture journals such as Casabella, Domus, A+U, and Architect Magazine. His work has won over 30 design awards, including three Progressive Architecture Awards. He speaks regularly at industry conferences and participates on numerous design committee panels.

“We believe in “evolutionary architecture” which places our planet’s well-being first while providing our clients economically viable solutions within the built environment,” comments Palma. “Today, it’s no longer just about a building but rather about how it enriches communities through resilience and social wellbeing. The Basel in Miami encompasses all these things and we are very proud to be part of it.”

The Basel Miami will be located at 205 SW 3rd Street, Miami, FL 33130. For more information, visit: www.thebaselmiami.com or call/email Sean McCormick at 305.206.4734 or sjm@mccormickllp.com.

My 2018 Art Basel Listicle: The A to Z of Where #MyArtEscape Will Be

If you’ve landed on my page and happen to be looking for Miami’s best Art Basel (Miami Art Week) parties, you’ve come to the wrong place. I’ve been writing about art fairs for the last four years and to me, it’s the most wonderful time of the year!

Why? Because for less than the price of an airfare, you have a chance to see art from all over the world, talk to the gallerists and sometimes meet the artists.

If you spend too much of that time attending parties, you won’t have the energy to survive the art trek mileage.

So here I go, jumping into the Google pool of listicles with an “A to Z” where I’ll be this year. Put on some comfortable shoes and join me on the trip!

Art Basel 2017

Art Basel

If you’ve never been to an art fair before, start with Art Basel  in Miami Beach. After all, Miami would not be the western hemisphere’s premier destination for art collectors that it is, if Art Basel had not debuted in 2002. Besides a chance to visit 268 leading galleries representing 35 countries, you’ll get to see the completed renovation of the Miami Beach Convention Center.

Rather than walk in and figure it out, I suggest you download the Art Basel app and mark the galleries that you wish to visit ahead of time. If there is a particular artist who you like, search by his/her name and it will show you which gallery represents that artist.

As a journalist, I’m fortunate to have the opportunity to attend the press conference and preview, but if you want to try to beat the crowds, attend one of the morning Conversations and then enter the fair. There will still be a line, but this quiet time sets the tone for an inspiring visit.

I was disappointed to know that there won’t be a Public sector (the outdoor art installation at the Bass Museum) this year, but you may want to check out the multidisciplinary installation, ‘Autorreconstrucción: To Insist, to Insist, to Insist…’ by Abraham Cruzvillegas. The project which is an Art Basel partnership with curator Phillipp Kaiser and The Kitchen, takes place in the Grand Ballroom and is free and open to the public: December 6 – 9 at 3:00 and 5:00 p.m.

Thursday, December 6, 2018, 3pm to 8pm; Friday, December 7, 2018, 12noon to 8pm; Saturday, December 8, 2018, 12noon to 8pm; Sunday, December 9, 2018, 12noon to 6pm

Miami Beach Convention Center | Art Basel Website

Art Miami

Art Miami

This year, Art Miami and its sister fair CONTEXT Art Miami are presenting their 29th edition and the second year located at the site of the former Miami Herald building. It’s impressive to say the least, and there’s something about the infiltration of natural light and bay views that makes this new setting very relaxing. Now although Art Basel in Miami Beach did change Miami’s art world landscape, did you know that Art Miami is the original and longest-running contemporary art fair in Miami?

Expect to see significant artworks, projects and installations from over 160 galleries from almost 30 countries.

Although I have yet to visit CONTEXT, I have visited Aqua Art Miami located at the Aqua Hotel. If you’re not in the art collecting big leagues, here’s a great place to start your art collection. You’ll find works by young, emerging and mid-career artists.

Wednesday, Dec. 5 – Sat., Dec. 8, 11AM –8PM; Sunday, Dec. 9, 11AM – 6PM

One Herald Plaza @ NE 14th Street | Art Miami Website

Design Miami 2017

Design Miami

I love Design Miami  and if I had an unlimited interior design budget, here’s where I’d be home shopping! Focused on high-end design, areas are aesthetically pleasing and full of inspiration. If you’re lucky enough to afford it, whatever you buy will be collectible and often a one-of-a-kind investment. I know that nobody seems to like the term: “functional art,” but to me there’s nothing nicer than owning a piece of art that can be enjoyed in many ways and not just looked at.

This year, plan to visit the Curio exhibitions which are small-scale, immersive installations presented by brands, galleries, and designers alongside the gallery program. There will be eleven new presentations.

Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández, recipients of the 2018 Design Miami/Visionary Award will present a retrospective of their work that focus on design with a social dimension such as addressing social justice and peacemaking, as well as the emphasizing the importance of handcrafted products in a world where automation is replacing humans.

There will also be about thirty-two galleries from all over the world with booth exhibitions.

Wednesday, December 5, 12–8PM; Thursday, December 6, 10AM–8PM; Friday, December 7, 11AM–8PM; Saturday, December 8, 12–8PM; Sunday, December 9, 12–6PM

Meridian Ave. and 19th Street | Design Miami Website

NADA 2017

NADA

I visited NADA (New Art Dealers Alliance) for the first time last year. I enjoyed the smaller venue (Ice Palace Studios) and the intimate feel. Although it’s been years since I visited New York, there is an urban vibe to NADA and it feels like walking through a gallery district on a warm, summer evening.

NADA will have 125 exhibitors representing 23 countries of which 37 are first time exhibitors, 64 are NADA Member galleries and 26 project spaces.

Here is another fair to begin your art collection or continue supporting emerging. The NADA Miami International Gallery Prize is awarded to galleries based outside of the US that often have not participated in a US art fair before. The award minimizes the gallery’s financial risk and encourages experimentation. This year’s recipients are, CARNE Gallery (Bogotá) and Galeria Dawid Radziszewski (Warsaw.)

Thursday, December 6, 2–7pm; Friday, December 7, 11am–7pm; Saturday, December 8, 11am–7pm; Sunday, December 9, 11am–5pm

Ice Palace Studios (1400 N Miami Ave) | NADA Website

PINTA Miami

I have yet to visit PINTA Miami and am looking forward to it! PINTA is in its 12th edition and in its main section, will include 60 galleries from Latin America, United States and Europe. PINTA Countries will have sections dedicated to Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Mexico, and for the first time will include Spain.

Other areas to visit are: Project Section; Proyecto Visible; Collections Program; PINTA Platforms; and PINTA Editions.

Thursday, December 6, 12pm–8pm: Friday, December, 12pm–8pm; Saturday, December 8, 12pm–8pm; Sunday, December 9, 12pm–7pm

Mana Wynwood | PINTA Miami Website

PULSE Contemporary Art Fair

This will be my first visit to PULSE Contemporary Art Fair. I’ve tried in past years, but being set apart from the other fairs on Miami Beach and not contained like the mainland ones made visiting a challenge. However, that’s just me and no reason for you not to visit. The 14th edition of PULSE exclusively showcases contemporary art, from over 70 galleries from countries including: China, Denmark, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Netherlands, Scotland, South Africa, Switzerland and Ukraine.

Like Untitled and SCOPE art fairs, PULSE is situated right on the Miami Beach sand. Whereas the North Tent houses the galleries, the South Tent presents SOLO exhibitions and CONVERSATIONS which are dual artist shows that encourage galleries to explore conceptual dialogues between artists who they represent.

Friday, December 7, 10am – 7pm; Saturday, December 8, 10 am – 7pm; Sunday, December 9, 10am – 5pm

Indian Beach Park | PULSE Website

SCOPE, Miami 2017

SCOPE Miami Beach

I have been secretly admiring SCOPE Miami Beach for the past few years. As a marketer, SCOPE is at the top of their promo game and, this fair and the way it’s presented is just outright cool. Gallerists are approachable, people look engaged and you can find some really unique and gutsy art at affordable prices. If you’re looking for a rest stop, SCOPE should be one of your top choices for light bites, libations and stellar views.

Celebrating its 18th edition, expect to see a diverse range of over 130 contemporary exhibitors. There’s also a New Contemporary section; a 360° experience of VIP Programming; Special Projects; Panel Discussions; Bombay Sapphire Artisan Series; Superchief Gallery; and publication, HI-FRUCTOSE will transform the SCOPE tent with ambitious projects featuring artists Okuda, Hot Tea, and AJ Fosik.

Wed-Sun | Dec 5-9 | 11am- 8pm

801 Ocean Drive | SCOPE Website

Spectrum Miami/Red Dot Miami

Here’s another fair that does an outstanding job of marketing its event. Because of my job, I notice these things, but even if I didn’t, I believe, Spectrum Miami and Red Dot may be a great place for emerging and local artists to gain some exposure and hopefully, sell their art. Side by side, both fairs offer 100,000 square feet of exhibition space. Red Dot Miami is a curated gallery-only contemporary art show and Spectrum Miami features the work of more than 160 exhibiting artists and galleries from the Florida region, U.S. and around the globe. Here is the perfect opportunity to engage with the artists directly and “shop local.” I’m looking forward to my first visit!

Thursday, December 6th: 1:00PM – 9:00PM; Friday, December 7th: 1:00PM – 10:00PM; Saturday, December 8th: 1:00PM – 9:00PM; Sunday, December 9th: 12:00PM – 5:00PM

Mana Wynwood | Spectrum Website | Red Dot Website

Superfine!

Superfine! presents its fourth Miami edition presenting 38 solo artist booths and 11 galleries. If you find a work of art that you don’t want to live without, this fair helps to make it affordable offering tools like Art Money: zero interest loans and low monthly payments. 75% of the art ranges in price from $300 to $5000. In a press release, Superfine Director, Alex Mitow says, “Art should be about experiencing wonder and discovery, being enlightened and excited. Too many fairs and galleries get wrapped up in art world politics and forget their prime duty: to connect the work of talented artists with people who love and appreciate it. That’s the mindset we are seeking (and succeeding) to correct.” Don’t miss out on the Young Collectors; Ice Cream Social and other fun events.

Thursday December 6, 11am-10pm; Friday December 7, 11am – 10pm; Saturday, December 8, 11am – 10pm; Sunday, December 9, 11am – 8pm

1001 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach, FL 33139 | Superfine! Website

Untitled, Miami Beach 2017

Untitled, Miami Beach

It’s impossible to pick a favorite art fair because each one has its own character and of course, caters to different types of collectors. However, I love Untitled, Miami Beach! From the hot pink tent entrance and ocean view; to the vaulted (tent) ceilings and bright natural light; and beautiful and intellectually stimulating gallery presentations, it’s one fair that I could return to each day. This year is Untitled, Miami Beach’s 7th edition presenting 133 international exhibitors from 30 countries (46 exhibitors are new.)

I am particularly interested in seeing the artist-focused special projects which explore themes such as collectiveness, displacement, migration, and precarious presence, transpiring from the artists and artworks presented by exhibitors.

If you are a VIP member, be sure to check out the Podcast, Special Programs and Events. And, if you live close to Miami Beach, definitely take the mid-Miami Art Week Sunrise Yoga class break offered at the north end of the Untitled, Art tent.

Wednesday, Dec 5, 11am – 7pm; Thursday, Dec 6, 11am – 7pm; Friday, Dec 7, 11am – 7pm; Saturday, Dec 8, 11am – 7pm; Sunday, Dec 9, 11am – 5pm

Ocean Drive & 12th Street  Untitled Website

Thanks for making it to the end of the first #MyArtEscape listicle! I hope it was helpful.

Until the next time, enjoy the trip, look closely to engage with art, and maybe start or add to your collection.

@AllegoryPR #MyArtEscape on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.